Dokument: Object Mass Nouns: A Frame Based Analysis

Titel:Object Mass Nouns: A Frame Based Analysis
URL für Lesezeichen:https://docserv.uni-duesseldorf.de/servlets/DocumentServlet?id=55618
URN (NBN):urn:nbn:de:hbz:061-20210315-130647-4
Kollektion:Dissertationen
Sprache:Englisch
Dokumententyp:Wissenschaftliche Abschlussarbeiten » Dissertation
Medientyp:Text
Autor: Erbach, Kurt [Autor]
Dateien:
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Dateien vom 03.03.2021 / geändert 03.03.2021
Beitragende:Prof. Dr. Filip, Hana [Gutachter]
Prof. Dr. Scott Grimm [Gutachter]
Stichwörter:Object mass nouns, count/mass distinction, countability, formal semantics, compartive linguistics
Dewey Dezimal-Klassifikation:400 Sprache » 410 Linguistik
Beschreibung:The hypothesis explored in this thesis is that the number of object mass nouns (e.g. furniture, jewelry) in a given language is related to the number of morphosyntactic environments sensitive to the countability nouns (e.g. many, much) in that language. This hypothesis, together with the analysis of Sutton and Filip (2016b,c, 2018, 2019); Filip and Sutton (2017) best captures the occurrence of object mass nouns across languages. The analysis of Sutton and Filip (2016b,c, 2018, 2019); Filip and Sutton (2017) accurately predicts which class of nouns will have object mass nouns across languages—collective artifacts—and my hypothesis provides a means of predicting the amount of object mass nouns in a given language: languages with many morphosyntactic reflexes of the mass/count distinction will likewise have many object mass nouns—e.g. English—and languages with few morphosyntactic reflexes of the mass/count distinction will likewise have few object mass nouns—e.g. Greek, Hungarian, and Japanese.
I show that certain theories of the mass/count distinction, namely those of Chierchia (2010, 2015) and Rothstein (2010, 2017) are respectively too strong and too weak in terms of their ability to account for the presence of small classes of object mass nouns
in Greek, Hungarian, and Japanese. I extend the analysis of Sutton and Filip (2016b,c, 2018, 2019); Filip and Sutton (2017) to account for the characteristic properties of the mass/count distinctions in Greek, Hungarian, and Japanese, and I show that this analysis of countability, together with my hypothesis about the relationship between morphosyntactic reflexes and object mass nouns, accurately predicts the conceptual class and amount of object mass nouns in each of these languages. What follows from my hypothesis is the idea that there are several factors at play in determining the amount of object mass nouns in a given language, rather than just one as argued by Chierchia (2010, 2015). Such characteristics include the use of morphosyntax including but not limited to number marking, classifiers, mass/count specific determiners, derivational morphology such as -wear/ware in English; the frequency of use of each of such morphosyntax; and the size of the relevant lexicon—i.e. the amount of such morphosyntax and the number of nouns in a given language.
Fachbereich / Einrichtung:Philosophische Fakultät » Institut für Sprache und Information
Dokument erstellt am:15.03.2021
Dateien geändert am:15.03.2021
Promotionsantrag am:08.05.2019
Datum der Promotion:24.06.2019
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